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ISBN 978-9985-58-812-3 Paperback
551 pages

Divine Comedy. Purgatorio (in Estonian)
Jumalik komöödia. Purgatoorium

Dante Alighieri 
Verses translated by Harald Rajamets, comments and preface by Ülar Ploom

18,85 €

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Dante Alighieri’s (1265–1321) Divine Comedy is considered as one of the greatest achievements in the art of poetry. The book has been translated and interpreted already for 700 years, and it has also become an important testing method of the vitality of national linguistic and literary traditions. The Estonian journey of Divine Comedy began in 1910, when the opening song of the poem was published in the translation of Villem Grünthal-Ridala.

The second book of Divine Comedy, Purgatorio, provides the typology of the purification of souls, and tells of Dante’s and Virgil’s meetings with noteworthy people upon climbing the Mount of Purgatory where Dante prepares himself for the journey to Paradise under the guidance of the love of his youth, Beatrice.

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ISBN 9789-985-58-771-3
Paperback
232 pages


The Dramas of Gandersheim Hrotsvita
Translated from Latin by Mari Murdvee 
12 €

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Hrotsvita (approx. 930/935 – after 975) is the first known female writer of the Middle Ages, as well as the first Western author, who has written Christian plays. There is very little known about Hrotsvita’s life, mainly that most of it was spent in the rich and famous Gandersheim monastery in Saxony. Hrotsvita’s known creation consists of eight hagiographical verse-tales, six plays in rhymed prose, two historic poems, one poem and some letters. The main portion of her literary legacy as a whole only exists in a manuscript preserved in Munich, which was rediscovered in the beginning of the 16th century.

The first part of The Dramas of Gandersheim Hrotsvita includes five versed hagiographies that all praise chastity and abstinence in different ways; the second part is written in rhymed prose and contains six plays with prefaces. There is mostly a female character and her religious change of heart or martyrdom in the centre of the drama, written in Terentius’ example.

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ISBN 978-9985-58-754-6
Paperback 
136 pages

Uus elu. Vita nova 
New Life (in Estonian)
Dante Alighieri
Translated from Italian by Rein Raud

11 €

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Considered by many to be the masterpiece of Dante's youth, New Life is the one of the finest poetical works, and the first example of the modern novel in Italian. At the age of nine, Dante met and fell in love with Beatrice. Although she died at an early age, she remained his lifelong muse. New Life is Dante's profound attempt both to reconcile the deep anguish he suffered after her loss, and also to capture something of her eternal beauty, seeing her as the universal figure of woman. Incorporating poems and prose, and indicative of Dante's remarkable linguistic style, New Life still remains one of the greatest works in the literature of love.

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ISBN 978-9985-58-710-2
Paperback 
550 pages

Jumalik komöödia. Põrgu 
The Divine Comedy. The Hell (in Estonian)
Dante Alighieri
Translated by Harald Rajamets, commented by Ülar Ploom

12 €

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The Divine Comedy (la Divina Commedia in Italian) is an epic poem written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321. It is widely considered to be the preeminent work of Italian literature and is also seen as one of the greatest achievements of world literature. The poem's imaginative and allegorical vision of the afterlife is a culmination of the medieval world-view as it had evolved in the Western Church. It is divided into three parts: Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso.
Hell (Inferno, 1314) is the first and the most highly regarded section of Dante’s chef d’oeuvre. On the surface, the poem describes Dante's travels through Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, but on a deeper level, it is an allegorical representation of the soul's journey towards God. Dante draws on medieval Christian theology and philosophy, especially the writings of Thomas Aquinas.
Originally, the work was simply titled Commedia, but it was later christened Divina by Giovanni Boccaccio.
In 1910, V.G. Ridala made the first attempt to translate Dante’s Hell into Estonian. J. Semper took over the work in 1939, but the times were not favourable for translation. Harald Rajamets began his translation of Dante’s Hell at the beginning of the sixties, and now the result of 30 years of dedicated labour has finally been published.