Human rights

Human Rights in the Digital Society

The LLM programme in Human Rights in the Digital Society was created to address new developments and challenges in law and society that have arisen in connection with the ever-increasing digitalisation.

Study level Master's Studies

Duration of study 2 years

Language English

Cost per semester 1750

The programme provides a unique opportunity engage with questions like what are the limits of the freedom of speech online or what is sovereignty over the digital environment? Or how to balance human rights in the online environment? This programme will provide students with the skill-set necessary analyse the effects of digitalisation on human rights and law in general. The courses have a balance between theory and practical problems and assignments. The students will be encouraged to take a critical perspective, research topical issues that they feel passionate about and highlight flaws in the current system.

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Who are we looking for?

The LLM programme in Human Rights in the Digital Society is ideal for students who have a passion for human rights and a desire to make an impact in either the public or private sphere. But it is also tailored for those who have a keen interest in how the internet has changed the way societies functions and in the problems that arise when you try to apply traditional legal rules to the online world. The programme has been developed to allow you to focus on one of these main issues (human rights and digitalisation), while also gaining an understanding of the other. You do not need any detailed knowledge of law or digitalisation to study on this programme, just enthusiasm and motivation to develop the necessary skills and knowledge during your studies.

Why study with us?
  • Good quality and varied studies that will provide a deep understanding of different aspects of human rights in the digital era.
  • The lecturers have international networks that make it possible to arrange exciting international events that students can participate in.
  • After graduating you will have a broad range of international and domestic career paths to choose from – e.g. international organisations, courts, NGOs, media companies.
  • The research focus of the programme guarantees that you will develop the skills and knowledge necessary for doctoral studies.
  • Unique opportuity to explore the impact of digitalisation on society in general and human rights in particular.

Course outline

The programme courses are scheduled on weekdays and the normal time to complete the programme is four semesters. The programme is composed of compulsory law courses (54 ECTS), elective law courses (24/36 ECTS), open elective courses (6 ECTS), the master’s thesis (24 ECTS) and a mandatory internship (6 ECTS). The aim of the internship is to give students an opportunity to apply the skills and knowledge acquired in the classroom by working under the direction of a practicing legal professional. The students also participate in an interdisciplinary project (6 ECTS), which provides another opportunity to practice the skills they have developed. The courses include a mix of subjects that deal with human rights and digitalisation and also provide an opportunity to develop research skills throughout the four semesters.

Study programme

Academic Staff

Our faculty is international, with members from Estonia, Finland, Germany, Italy, Russia, China, and the United States of America. Further, among our faculty are past and current lawmakers (members of parliament), judges, lawyers, and well known legal scholars, which combines to make a well balanced legal education from the theoretical and practical viewpoints.

 

Rein Müllerson is the Research Professor of Law and Politics at Tallinn University and was the most recent past president of Institut de Droit Internationalis. He was Professor and Chair of International Law at King's College, London (1994-2009). He has been a member of the United Nations Human Rights Committee (1988-92), visiting centennial professor of the London School of Economics and Political Science (1992-94), and first deputy foreign minister of Estonia (1991-92). Professor Müllerson is an internationally recognized legal scholar, the author of eleven books on international law and politics and more than 200 articles and reviews.


Massimo La Torre is the Professor of European Law at Tallinn University, and he is also a Professor at the Department of Law of the Università di Catanzaro (Italy) and at the Law School of the University of Hull (United Kingdom). He held numerous visiting professorial fellowships at European and American universities, and he was fellow of the Alliance Française, the Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, the British Council and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. Professor La Torrie is a prolific writer on legal philosophy, political philosophy and questions of subjective rights, sovereignty, freedom, the rule of law and democracy.


Mart Susi is the Professor of Human Rights at Tallinn University and the Head of the Law study area. Professor Susi is active in publishing articles and commentaries on human rights, with special focus on new human rights.


Samuli Miettinen is associate professor of transnational law at Tallinn University and holds the title of docent (adjunct professor/hablitation) in European law at the universities of Helsinki and Lapland He has taught a wide range of international and EU law subjects at European universities and is currently working on issues in EU public and criminal law. Miettinen is the author of The Political Constitution of EU Criminal Law (Hart, forthcoming 2017), The Europeanization of Criminal Law (Helsinki, 2015), Criminal Law and Policy in the European Union (Routledge, 2012) and The Sporting Exception in European Union Law (Asser/Cambridge, 2008, with Richard Parrish), some 40 longer articles or book chapters, and is co-editor of Data Protection, Privacy and European Regulation in the Digital Age (Forum Iuris, 2016, with Tobias Bräutigam). Miettinen was FIDE national rapporteur for Finland in 2016 (Competence) and 2014 (Citizenship), and is also contact point for Finland in the European Criminal Law Academic Network.


Igor Gräzin is Lecturer of Law at Tallinn University and a member of the Estonian Parliament. He taught law in the United States at the University of Notre Dame and was a research fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington D.C. He has written academic papers on the philosophy of law, theory of legal interpretation, and macroeconomics.


Tiina Pajuste, PhD,is a Lecturer in International and European Law at Tallinn University.  Dr. Pajuste received her PhD from the University of Cambridge on “Accountability Mechanisms for International Organisations”.  Before her doctoral studies, she completed a Diploma in International Law at Cambridge, on the accountability of international territorial administrations. She also holds a LLM in Public International Law from the University of Helsinki (Finland) and a BA in Law from the University of Tartu (Estonia). Her research interests focus mainly on the activity and impact of international organisations, examining both practical and theoretical issues. 


Heiki Lindpere is a lecturer of International Law at Tallinn University. He is an internationally recognized expert on the law of the sea and a member of the Hague Permanent Court of Arbitration.

Admission Requirements

General requirements:
Entrance exams:
  • The entrance exam consists of written assignment (written answers to the questions concerning their motivation and desire to study at the programme) and an interview with the admissions committee via Skype.
  • For the purposes of identity verification at the admission procedure the Admission Committee has the right to take a screenshot during the oral part of the admission exam carried out via video bridge.
  • Maximum number of points is 100 (50% written, 50% oral part).
  • Students receiving minimum 30 points of the written part, are allowed to the oral interview.
  • Minimum programme enrollment threshold: 70 points out of 100.
  • Written assignment. Please submit a motivation letter (ca 1200 words), answering the following questions:
  • 1. The choice of the study programme: Why Tallinn University? Why this programme? What courses of the programme are you most interested in?
    2. Previous experience and studies: What is your first degree in? Why did you choose field of study? How does it relate to our MA programme? 
    3. Your plans after MA studies: Where do you see yourself in three years? How will the MA studies help your career? 
    4. Knowledge of the field: Briefly discuss one issue regarding human rights and digitalization.
    5. How do you plan to finance your studies?

Post-graduate destinations

The study programme develops knowledge and skills that open up different career paths in the modern legal world. Different opportunities will be available to you in both the public and private sectors.

Public sector:

  • Jobs in international organisations like the UN, European Council and the EU – all these institutions have an increasing need for specialists in human rights and digitalisation.
  • Jobs in international courts – both the European Court of Human Rights and the European Court of Justice need more experts that can advise judges on topical human rights issues.
  • Domestic public sector – public management institutions of EU and ohter states have to modernise their understanding of international law and human rights, in light of new developments, so there is a demand for experts with the necessary knowledge who can engage with these new challenges.
  • Academia – since the study programme has a research focus, it will prepare you for advanced studies in doctoral programmes around the world.

Private sector:

  • Media companies – both globaal and regionaal media companies face obligations of ensuring human rights in their daily activities. Teams are being formed, which are tasked to develop and implement internal rules in this area.
  • Legal consultancy companies – more and more disputes arise regarding relationships and violations in the digital space.
  • NGOs – both large International NGOs like Human Rights Watch and NGOs with local importance have to take into account of the globaal developments in International law and human rights.

Why School of Governance, Law and Society?

  • The lecturers have international networks that make it possible to arrange exciting international events that students can participate in.
  • Our alumni have been very successful in finding jobs. Our alumni include members of parliament, judges, prosecutors, notaries, attorneys, public officials etc.
  • SOGOLAS and the law study area are at the forefront of implenting a broad range of innovative study methods, which make your studies varied and exciting. You will develop different transferrable skills like conducting research, critical analysis, synthesis of complex ideas and presentation skills.
  • Modern study environment – SOGOLAS is located in the new science building of Tallinn University – Astra – that has great conditions for study and leisure. There is a library with a study room that is open 24h, a stuent cafe and a cosy atrium. E-study opportunities are widely used as courses incorporate online materials, video lectures, tests, etc.
  • International opportunities – SOGOLAS has dozens of ERASMUS partnership contracts that makes it possible for you to go abroad to enjoy European student life.
Extracurricular Activities

Tallinn University has many opportunities for students to have an active social life, such as choir singing, gym practice, and the chance to become involved in numerous student organizations and social clubs. SOGOLAS’s students have a student representation organisation, Civitas that takes care of students’ educational and social needs. And further, Law students have two organizations that support the academic and professional side of law studies and balance that out with recreational and social activities; the International Law Guild for students in Tallinn, and Primus Collegium for students in Helsinki. Both organizations arrange visits to law firms and legal institutions, host social gatherings and speaker events, and trips abroad. Furthermore, SOGOLAS organizes conferences and special events every year, open to students and researchers, as well as many public lecturers. 

Resources

There is major human rights project that the law study area is coordinating and that organises exciting events that our students can participate in:

The project “HURMUR: Human rights – mutually raising excellence” is a European Commission Project funded under the first TWINNING call of Horizon 2020 (Project No. 692143). The project will decisively expand the world-class research area of human rights in Europe. Tallinn University Law School will develop research excellence of human rights and become involved in global research and regional dissemination networks through specific activities of an outstanding consortium, where two other partners are premier global academic institutions in the field of human rights – the Danish Institute for Human Rights and Walther Schücking Institute of International Law (Kiel University, Germany).
www.hur-mur.eu 

Tallinn University has many opportunities for students to have an active social life, such as choir singing, gym practice, and the chance to become involved in numerous student organizations and social clubs. SOGOLAS’s students have a student representation organisation, Civitas that takes care of students’ educational and social needs. And further, Law students have two organizations that support the academic and professional side of law studies and balance that out with recreational and social activities; the International Law Guild for students in Tallinn, and Primus Collegium for students in Helsinki. Both organizations arrange visits to law firms and legal institutions, host social gatherings and speaker events, and trips abroad. Furthermore, SOGOLAS organizes conferences and special events every year, open to students and researchers, as well as many public lecturers. 

Environment

 Tallinn University has a modern urban campus located in the center of the city. Our students have access to physical and online libraries, computer labs, cafeterias and cafes. Further, the university has all the facilities necessary for a productive learning environment and ample opportunities for leisure, sports, and social activities, all leading to an exciting and well balanced student life.

Our law program is taught entirely in the English language by competent legal professionals and legal scholars. Our student body is international, with students from many countries in Europe, as well as students from Africa, Asia, and the Americas, all studying law at Tallinn University. Day-to-day student life is always international at Tallinn University, as our law program is closely connected with other English language programs and among your classmates, you will frequently find visiting Erasmus students.

Take a walk around our campus via the virtual tour!

Contact us

In case you have any questions about the programme do not hesitate to contact us. 
  • Specific questions regarding the programme should be directed to the School of Governance, Law and Society:
    E-mail: maris.listrom@tlu.ee
  • For additional guidelines regarding admission procedure please contact the international admission specialist.
    E-mail: admissions@tlu.ee

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